Voices Against War

Published: 19-Apr-2018

Find out more about New Zealanders who objected to military service on religious, ethical or political grounds and the penalties they and their families suffered, from historian Margaret Lovell-Smith, lead researcher for the Voices Against War project.

voices against war event poster 

Public talk with:

Margaret Lovell-Smith

Kaiapoi Library

Thursday, 19 April, 7pm

The pakeha peace movement in Canterbury began in resistance to compulsory military training, introduced in 1911. Three anti-militarist organisations began at this time and young men went to prison for their beliefs.

Resistance continued during the war when war regulations made it illegal to speak against the war effort and several Canterbury men were imprisoned for sedition. Many more were imprisoned for refusing to serve in the military.

They were supported by many in the Labour Movement, and women peace activists.

Find out more about those who objected to military service on religious, ethical or political grounds and the penalties they and their families suffered. Margaret will include in her talk special mention of North Canterbury families who were among the leaders of the anti-militarist movement at this time.

Margaret is an independent historian and lead researcher for the Voices Against War project. She has previously published on topics of local and regional history, women’s biography and the nineteenth century women's movement in Canterbury.

Check out Voices Against War for more.

Book at any Waimakariri Library or phone 311 8901